Introduction

Imagine just sitting there doing almost nothing, and you want to move around. All you have to do is move one part of your structure and the rest you will move with you. Now imagine sitting in the bottom of a warm, still pond. Then, a giant human person jumps in and all the silt (your home) is sent fluttering around the pond. So, you invade the human, just like knights invading an enemy castle. Now, see the human, embrace the human. BE the human, the silt moves around you accidentally inhale and water is up your nose. But, what else is too?

How do Amoebas Change Their Body Shape?


    This a diagram of an Amoeba's structure.
This a diagram of an Amoeba's structure.

Amoebas have small structures that move side to side to move the Amoeba. It can use this function many ways, like moving through the human body. Also, the movement if studied very closely can resemble a magnet attracting another magnet or a magnetic pull. But, an Amoeba, not a magnet.

Where do Amoebas Live?

    This is a picture of a pond.  Though a pond may not look as well-kept as this one, an Amoeba can still be living in almost any pond.
This is a picture of a pond. Though a pond may not look as well-kept as this one, an Amoeba can still be living in almost any pond.


In the U.S., they're typically found in freshwater sources in southern states. In addition to lakes and rivers, these include hot springs, warm water runoff from industrial plants, poorly maintained swimming pools, and water heaters kept at temperatures below 117 degrees. The amoeba can also be found in soil.

How do Amoebas enter the Body?


Typically, Amoebas infect people through the nose. Once they have a toehold there, they travel up to the brain, where they destroy tissue. The infection typically occurs when people go swimming in lakes and rivers and other surface water, especially in warm weather. Brain-eating Amoebas can also be called... Naegleria Fowleri.

Conclusion


In conclusion, the Amoeba Cell is exciting and fascinating. It can live in the human body and thrive on the tissue in the brain, an Amoeba can also move with little structures. A few parts of the structure at a time! Amoeba’s are also a single-celled organism. So, even though an Amoeba is a single-cell organism, does not mean that it can’t kill a human. Or, live in a pond and move one tiny bit at a time. For more on Amoebas, check the source used in this article. They are listed down below in the References area. :)

References



Works Cited
Amoebas in Motion. YouTube. N.p., 30 Apr. 2008. Web. 30 Apr. 2008. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pR7TNzJ_pA>.
“Brain-Eating Amoeba.” WebMD: 1+. WebMD. Web. 10 Mar. 2016. <http://www.webmd.com/brain/brain-eating-amoeba>.
“How to Stay Safe from Naegleria Fowleri.” CBS News: 1-8. CBS News. Web. 29 Feb. 2016. <http://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/brain-eating-amoeba-how-to-stay-safe-from-naegleria-fowleri/>.
Single-Celled Organisms Cochran, 1997. Video Segment Discovery Education. Web. 18/2/2016. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com>.
Types of Cells: Amoeba and Animal Cell Discovery Education, 2004. Video Segment Discovery Education. Web. 18/2/2016. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com>.
Yan, Holly. “Brain-Eating Amoeba Kills 14 Year-old Star Athlete.” CNN News: 1+. Cnn. Web. 31 Aug. 2015. <http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/31/health/brain-eating-amoeba-deaths/>.


Introduction
How do Amoebas Change Their Body Shape?
Where do Amoebas Live?
How do Amoebas enter the Body?
Conclusion
References




Imagine just sitting there doing almost nothing, and you want to move around. All you have to do is move one part of your structure and the rest you will move with you. Now imagine sitting in the bottom of a warm, still pond. Then, a giant human jumps in and all the silt (your home) is sent fluttering around the pond. So, you invade the human like knights invading a enemy castle. Now, see the human, embrace the human. BE the human, the silt moves around you accidentally inhale and water is up your nose. But, what else is too?


In the U.S., they're typically found in freshwater sources in southern states. In addition to lakes and rivers, these include hot springs, warm water runoff from industrial plants, poorly maintained swimming pools, and water heaters kept at temperatures below 117 degrees. The amoeba can also be found in soil.


external image pond-hd-wallpaper-download-pond-images-free.jpgexternal image pond-hd-wallpaper-download-pond-images-free.jpgexternal image XAc5bSJ7lstD8v-hkCYJ2gbCpKu4DZ_5fmaz3n-S2kaZdp45N7y9IKMktR_YsruTDgF9OLnPiLu0KDH-EJUZUxtw3xwSvm6NRFmqHAcKaM7jtaw-HS4DGhGbBR0g-YpUDz7jEPjkNaegleria fowleri
Works Cited
Amoebas in Motion. YouTube. N.p., 30 Apr. 2008. Web. 30 Apr. 2008. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pR7TNzJ_pA>.
“Brain-Eating Amoeba.” WebMD: 1+. WebMD. Web. 10 Mar. 2016. <http://www.webmd.com/brain/brain-eating-amoeba>.
“How to Stay Safe from Naegleria Fowleri.” CBS News: 1-8. CBS News. Web. 29 Feb. 2016. <http://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/brain-eating-amoeba-how-to-stay-safe-from-naegleria-fowleri/>.
Single-Celled Organisms Cochran, 1997. Video Segment Discovery Education. Web. 18/2/2016. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com>.
Types of Cells: Amoeba and Animal Cell Discovery Education, 2004. Video Segment Discovery Education. Web. 18/2/2016. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com>.

Yan, Holly. “Brain-Eating Amoeba Kills 14 Year-old Star Athlete.” CNN News: 1+. Cnn. Web. 31 Aug. 2015. <http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/31/health/brain-eating-amoeba-deaths/>.

In conclusion, the Amoeba Cell is exciting and fascinating. It can live in the human body and thrive on the tissue in the brain, an Amoeba can also move with little structures. A few parts of the structure at a time! Amoeba’s are also a single-celled organism. So, even though an Amoeba is a single-cell organism, does not mean that it can’t kill a human. Or, live in a pond and move one tiny bit at a time. For more on Amoebas, check the source used in this article. They are listed down below in the References area.